Captivating Tatiana Maslany
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Tatiana was featured in a recent issue of Emmy magazine. Big thanks to my friend Mary for these. Enjoy!

2016: Emmy Magazine



Tatiana is featured on the current issue of Toronto Now. Check out scans below and a writeup of the article.

2016: Toronto Now

Globally, women are making big strides in the movie industry. But in Canada, we’re lagging way behind. We talked to a group of fierce, frustrated filmmakers to find out why

When Canada’s Tatiana Maslany of the hit TV series Orphan Black won the Emmy for lead actress in a drama, she used her acceptance speech to remind the entertainment industry about a glaring problem.

“I feel so lucky to be on a show that puts women at the centre,” she announced.

Maslany’s moment arrived almost a year after Prime Minister Justin Trudeau implemented gender parity in his cabinet (“Because it’s 2015!”); six months after the National Film Board of Canada announced that 50 per cent of its productions would be by female filmmakers; and a week after TIFF hosted a vital Dialogues session called Women At The Helm: “Because it’s 2016!”

The TIFF panel included representatives from other countries who outlined their initiatives for getting more women in the director’s chair and described the very real struggles in getting there.

Sally Caplan, the head of production at Screen Australia, explained the multiple initiatives in place to achieve a 50/50 gender split in the films down under by 2018. The amazing Anna Serner, CEO of the Swedish Film Institute, spelled out how she had already achieved gender parity in her country’s cinema.

Then came Carolle Brabant, the executive director of Telefilm Canada, our primary funding body. Since spring, Telefilm had been hyping a major announcement.

And Brabant delivered it: “Our intention is to have by 2020 a more diverse portfolio in terms of gender, in terms of cultural diversity and in terms of Indigenous representation.”

That’s it. No initiatives. No specific targets. No ideas on how Telefilm plans to improve representation.

Brabant sounded like that kid in math class who hadn’t done her homework, scrambling for an answer when the teacher called her to break down a linear equation. She latched onto the “50/50 by 2020” movement but left out the essential 50/50 part. Telefilm’s chief representative instead promised a “working group” that will meet this month to discuss how in four years it will achieve some vague sense of improved diversity (from almost none).

“But that doesn’t mean anything,” says Maslany, when I report Telefilm’s some-sort-of-improvement plan to her.

We’re at TIFF days after the panel, and just days before the Emmys. Maslany’s gearing up for the premiere of Two Lovers And A Bear, an Arctic-set drama about a turbulent love affair that opens this weekend. She walked into this interview vibrant and cheery, but her mood gave way to concerned and frustrated. She fought to find words.

“It just baffles me,” she says. “It is really hard for women to get into rooms that men are freely flowing in and out of. There are weird stigmas around female directors, like they don’t have technical savvy. There’s just all this bullshit. It’s like from the fucking 50s.

“This shouldn’t even be a conversation any more,” she adds. “How is there still reticence toward change? We shouldn’t have to get angry because it shouldn’t be happening. I think people are really scared to shift systems. It is such a male system, and it works and makes money.”
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I’ve added a couple new portrait additions of Tatiana from this year. Check them out below. Big thanks to my friend Kaci for some of these lovely photos.

2016: Photo Session #015
2016: Photo Session #016



I’ve added a few new movie stills of Tatiana from The Other Half thanks to my lovely friend Mary.

The Other Half: Movie Stills



Last update for a couple days.. for real this time! I added scans of Tatiana from Fashion Canada thanks to our friends at Maslany Brasil who kindly donated them to us. I’ve also added a bunch of new photos of Tatiana from VIFF.

2016: Fashion Canada Magazine
2016: September 29 – Vancouver International Film Festival



I won’t be online for a few days but I wanted to add these photos quickly. Tatiana is in attendance at the 2016 Canada Walk Of Fame Awards today. Thanks to my friends AliKat and Angela for these. I will add more when I get back online.

2016: October 6 – Canada’s Walk Of Fame Awards



Emmy-winning “Orphan Black” star Tatiana Maslany will be among the presenters at the upcoming Canada’s Walk of Fame induction ceremony.

Joining Maslany are two previous inductees: actor Kiefer Sutherland and retired astronaut Roberta Bondar. Retired hockey great Lanny McDonald, former tennis star turned broadcaster Chris Evert, and actress Sharon Gless of “Cagney and Lacey” fame are also among the presenters.

The late stage and screen icon Al Waxman is among six inductees in the 2016 class.

Fellow honourees include: NHL Hall of Famer Darryl Sittler, award-winning singer-songwriter Corey Hart, actor-director Jason Priestley, filmmaker Deepa Mehta, and veteran fashion entrepreneur and journalist Jeanne Beker.

Country star Brett Kissel will be the recipient of the Allan Slaight Honour, which is presented annually to a young Canadian making a positive impact in the music industry. Kissel is also on the list of scheduled performers, which includes singer Nelly Furtado and comedian Scott Thompson.

The newest inductees will be honoured at the Allstream Centre in Toronto on Thursday, and the event is slated to be televised Dec. 18 on Global.
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There’s an Emmy for Orphan Black in her recent past and a movie with Jake Gyllenhaal (called Stronger) in her immediate future.

Right now, Tatiana Maslany stars with Dane DeHaan in the drama, Two Lovers and a Bear, opening in theatres Friday.

Both actors were at the Toronto International Film Festival to promote their movie, which is the new feature from Oscar-nominated director Kim Nguyen (War Witch). Maslany, 31, and DeHaan, 30, play fragile characters struggling to overcome various personal demons; the story is set in Nunavut, where the Arctic wilderness is a pristine setting for a volatile relationship.

The lovers take a trip together into uncharted — literally and figuratively — terrain, as they face an uncertain future, but discover the past isn’t quite ready to let them go. Two Lovers and a Bear is painfully real but touched with magic: it does involve a polar bear who speaks with Gordon Pinsent’s voice.

“It read to me like an adult fairy tale, says DeHaan. “Their relationship and what was happening all rang true, but then it had these fantastical elements as well. I trusted Kim to pull it off, because of War Witch, and the way he deals with the fantastical elements in that. I think that’s one of his strengths as a director.”

DeHaan says he first met Nguyen at TIFF a few years ago, when the actor was at the festival promoting The Place Beyond the Pines.

The two became fast friends and decided they wanted to work together.

“I’m just a fan of his. I really jumped at the opportunity to make this movie.”

This movie, mind you, is emotionally raw and was filmed in the wilds around Iqaluit.

It was tough to make. And even tougher to talk about, says Maslany.

“It’s odd, reflecting back on an experience that’s so, almost etherial, so in the moment,” she says.

“With a film like this, there’s so little intellectual research done. It’s like, living in that environment, with the people who live there, and daily life just starts to seep into you. And to talk about it afterwards is like a weird packaging of a really complicated experience … It’s one thing when you’re filming it. Every moment is different when you’re filming it. Just being in that space — you’re not intellectualizing anything. It’s very much from your body.

“But it’s always odd to talk about acting.”

One of the things DeHaan and Maslany have in common is that both have been actors since childhood. DeHaan says he began by playing superheroes in his backyard in Allentown, Pennsylvania, where he grew up. “I was in community theatre and things like that when I was a kid,” he says. “I’ve only been doing it professionally since I got out of college, so, like, eight years or something.” DeHaan graduated from the University of North Carolina School of the Arts, making his film debut in 2010 in John Sayles’ Amigo and winning notice in the HBO series, In Treatment. His many films include Lawless, Kill Your Darlings, The Amazing Spider-Man 2 and Life and he stars in the upcoming films A Cure for Wellness, Tulip Fever and Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets (which co-stars Cara Delevingne and is directed by Luc Besson).

“I always wanted to act,” he says. “I just didn’t do it professionally until I had to, I guess.”

Maslany started acting at age nine in community theatre. In high school, the Regina native was both appearing in school productions and taking small film and TV jobs; she has several TV series on her resume, such as 2030 CE, Instant Star, Heartland and Being Erica, and has appeared in the films Eastern Promises, Violet & Daisy, The Vow and Woman in Gold, among many others.

About three years ago Maslany starred in the movies Picture Day and Cas and Dylan to critical acclaim, just around the same time that TV’s Orphan Black gave her an international audience.

The Emmy she just won for playing multiple characters on that show has added to a level of celebrity Maslany is still figuring out.

“Nothing of this other side of things ever occurred to me,” she says. “It’s odd, because it’s only with Orphan Black that any of that has come into play.”

Spoken like a Canadian 20-year vet of the profession …

“My work is totally opposite to this other beast, this machine, which you kind of have to be good at, and know how to navigate. And it has nothing to do with what I do,” she says cheerfully.

“It’s a weird byproduct that really doesn’t compute.”
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Just before Tatiana Maslany flew to Los Angeles to accept an Emmy Award for outstanding lead actress in a drama series for Orphan Black I asked her what she’s been doing lately.

“I filmed the movie Stronger and since then I’ve been chillin’ hard,” she laughed.

The Regina-born actress may have taken some downtime over the summer, but that’s likely the last time off she’ll see for the foreseeable future. Right now she defines the term ‘in demand,’ enjoying the kind of popularity usually reserved for the very top of the A-list. Her Emmy win lit the internet on fire, earning millions of mentions that made her the most talked-about person on Facebook and Twitter that night. Currently she is shooting the last season of Orphan Black and has three movies set for release, including Stronger opposite Jake Gyllenhaal and next weekend’s Two Lovers and a Bear.

The Nunavut-shot film focuses on star-crossed lovers Lucy and Roman, played by Dane DeHaan and a talking bear. Veteran actor Gordon Pinsent lent his kindly voice to the polar bear, but Maslany says she was scared of Agee, the full-size adult female who played the carnivorous title character.

“She can smell women and doesn’t like them,” Maslany said of the bear who stands over seven feet when on her hind legs.

Maslany doesn’t want to discuss the movie’s twists and turns. Instead she’d like audiences to enjoy the story the way she did when she was offered the part of Lucy.

“I didn’t know what to expect at any moment when I read the script. It would flip from this very heavy romance to comedy and it sort of feels like sci-fi or a thriller at the end.”

Maslany will say her character has “a restlessness to her spirit and a need to find some stillness and peace and a desperate love of Roman. She can’t live without him and can’t be with him.”

Filmed over the course of six weeks on locations in Nunavut, the shoot for Two Lovers and a Bear was often unforgiving. “Our stills photographer lost chunks of his nose (due to the cold),” she says, but adds that shooting in the isolated location was invaluable to her performance.

“Just as having a real polar bear there,” she says, “being in the actual environment is so much easier and telling and informing in terms of character and how you move through the world. You understand more about why Roman and Lucy are the way they are by being there and living in that kind of environment. You see how two people could need each other so desperately and be the only thing the other has.”

“There are such vibrant youth there. It was really cool to be part of the community. I got to meet and be part of it and see their artwork. At the same time there are a lot of issues up there in terms of things from years back and systemic things. It has this bizarre duality to it.”

“I loved it up there,” she says. “I would go back in a heartbeat.”
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